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Professorfangirl's Bordello of Learning

Because every pleasure deserves to be taken seriously

RE Sherlock & the 12 steps: I'm an atheist with interpersonal issues but I've been in AA for many years. I don't disagree with your read on Sherlock, but through the lens of my (admittedly atypical) personal experience it seems slightly less ooc! asked by Anonymous

Thank you, yes, it’s good to hear different views; that’s one of the things that troubles me about media depictions of recovery, that it’s made to look like a one-size-fits-all process. Around here, AA is given such a strong new-age spiritualist bent that it may be rather more cultish than in other places. I can’t imagine Sherlock putting up with the sanctimony for a second. AA absolutely works, and because it’s everywhere, it’s free, and it’s time-tested, I think every alcoholic/addict should try it. But it doesn’t work for all of us, and I’ve gotten the message more than once that because I got sober after I left AA, I’m not really sober. *Scratches at chip on shoulder*

Because Sherlock dressing in Willi Smith, snorting coke, and dancing to Roxy Music will always be my headcanon.

benedictervention:

x5vale:

knackorcraft:

cumbermums:

Everything about this. Just everything.

I’m embarrassed to tell you how long I spent staring at this gif.  But not embarrassed enough to stop staring.

This can possibly be one of my favorite acting part ever of the whole Sherlock series. I stare at the gif and hear his voice.

Sex on a stick!

He is singing along to Roxy Music’s “Slave to Love” and no one can tell me otherwise.

(Source: h1gh-functioning-sociopath, via mildredandbobbin)

nympheline:

bluepueblo:

Foggy Day, Oxford, England
photo by kamshots

Where I am, white bicycles mean death. They’ll appear overnight—locked, chained, and paper white—on the sidewalk right next to the spot where last week, or last month, or last year, a cyclist was struck by a careless car, and died there in the road.
Sometimes as I walk I touch my hand to streetlamps. I nod to every dog, play hopscotch on the flagstones, leave a trail of muffin crumbs. I count the white bicycles.
There are a lot of white bicycles.

nympheline:

bluepueblo:

Foggy Day, Oxford, England

photo by kamshots

Where I am, white bicycles mean death. They’ll appear overnight—locked, chained, and paper white—on the sidewalk right next to the spot where last week, or last month, or last year, a cyclist was struck by a careless car, and died there in the road.

Sometimes as I walk I touch my hand to streetlamps. I nod to every dog, play hopscotch on the flagstones, leave a trail of muffin crumbs. I count the white bicycles.

There are a lot of white bicycles.

nympheline:

thegreywinds:

Part 1

There is more than one faceless old woman who lives in your home. Of course there is. 

How can you tell? you ask. If they have no faces? you say. They could all be the same faceless old woman, you insist, just in a different dress or sweater or overalls and old, old shoes.

Silly girl.

Breathe deep, and deeper, and learn her scent. Listen to her skirts against the tile, her rings on the radiator. Listen to her speak. Listen to her breathe, and yawn, and sing you to sleep, each note emanating from the featureless form where her face should be.

And when was the last time you looked in the mirror?

(Source: cervvo)

(addiction, drugs tw) if you don't feel like answering, that's okay, please don't feel pressured! after your earlier post about sherlock and drugs, i was wondering if you've watched 'elementary' and, if so, what do you think of their choice to make sherlock a recovering addict and how that storyline has been handled these past two seasons? asked by singelisilverslippers

Oh yes, I watch Elementary and I like it a lot. They do a good job representing 12-step recovery without romanticising or getting gooey over it. My one reservation is—well, I just don’t see Sherlock in a 12-step program, because I don’t think he forms relationships the way others do. For those of us with both attachment disorders and addiction (they very, very often go together), 12-step recovery can backfire. The early part of it is invaluable: going to meetings teaches you about the course of addiction, how to restructure your thinking, and that there are very good strategies for recovery. But a big part of it is the group process and the sponsor-sponsee relationship. AA holds that both having a sponsor and being a sponsor are essential to recovery; this means that your sobriety depends in part on an intense interpersonal relationship. But attachment disorder means that you have a hard time forming relationships, and that it’s a psychologically dangerous area. That, and the 12-step emphasis on The Group and The Program, can put terrible stress on a person and set them up for failure. (I myself didn’t get fully sober until I stopped going to AA and started work with a counselor specializing in trauma and attachment.) If Sherlock is an addict, I certainly don’t think he’d be the kind of addict who does well in AA/NA, and though you wouldn’t know it from the media, there are other ways to get sober.

Thanks for the question!

haecceitiesphoto:

Snow falling with Black Mountain in the background. Warren Hedges. Siskiyou County California looking South. April, 2011.

haecceitiesphoto:

Snow falling with Black Mountain in the background. Warren Hedges. Siskiyou County California looking South. April, 2011.

I was reading your Shezza posts and I was wondering what you thought of ASiP's introduction of Sherlock's drug use during the drugs bust scene and specifically John's discovery of it. asked by all--stories

Well, I didn’t mind it so much there, though the language in the series has tended to echo traditional recovery narratives (e.g., the notion that any substance use, even a cigarette, is part of a relapse—“Are you sure tonight is a danger night?”). If they’re writing Sherlock as a true addict, then yes, that works.

But I’d like to think something more interesting might be happening in s3. Just after HLV aired I wrote about the drug-test scene. I’ve thought more about it since, especially as I’ve come to understand how s3 puts pressure on Sherlock’s self-definition as a thinking machine. Drugs are proof that mind and body are never separate, because in chemically affecting the brain they bodily affect thought. I think they have an important place in this season because the whole thing’s about Sherlock coming to terms with body and society, the fact that he’s embodied and capable of love, that he can’t extricate himself from his body or his relations to other people. Rather than isolating him, the incidents with drugs bring him physically closer to others: the slap in the face from Molly, the touch in drunken intimacy with John. The season is asking, can this man who’s all mind, pure logic, exist in a vulnerable body? (He begins under torture, he ends as a weeping child.) The drugs motif helps show that deduction happens not in the CGI ether but in the body-mind: not even Sherlock thinks outside the flesh.

chris evans - for flaunt magazine

This is what it looks like when a man’s photographed the way women usually are. To which I say

YES THANK

(via snogandagrope)

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